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“From FÖDA, Made Somewhere, and Firmalt”

Thin lines and fun typography come together in this week’s selections with work from Austin, Sydney, and Monterrey.

Top Knot by FÖDA

Top Knot by FÖDA

Top Knot is a contemporary American restaurant in Dallas, TX, with Asian roots, featuring flavors from Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Japan. Vertical Latin typography for Asian subjects is not entirely novel, but the execution in this instance, by Austin, TX-based FÖDA, offers a fresh take with a thin, wispy, condensed font set tightly between vertical lines that echo the facade of the restaurant. Additionally, a beautiful combination of textures — newspaper scans and other Illustrator-y patterns in red and blue hues are used generously throughout the restaurant’s materials. It’s too bad not so many people smoke anymore because those matchbooks are lit… and may be never be actually lit. See full project

Eight Elements by Made Somewhere

Eight Elements by Made Somewhere

Eight Elements is a ceramic and sculpture studio in Sydney, Australia. Dunno why eight, but that’s the key element for the logo by local firm Made Somewhere that arranges three circles to form a lovely, simple icon that is almost too annoyingly simple and annoyingly lovely. The wordmark is nicely spaced and it’s so satisfying that it’s the same thickness as the icon. The “8” masked inside the circle also looks like it could be a piece of jewelery or its own sculpture. Maybe it’s already done but I would love to see the logo as an actual brand to mark each sculpture. See full project

Rrëy by Firmalt

Rrëy by Firmalt

Rrëy is a craft beer brewed in Monterrey, Mexico, with attitude to spare. The name is a play on words where “rey” means king but is also the last part of Monterrey while the umlauts are taken from Kölsch, which is their signature beer style. The wordmark is a bold, irreverent serif with a great presence and somewhat awkward forms that add to the overall confidence of the brand. The supporting typography could be a little bit better (or at least given more space to breathe) but the packaging and other materials strike a convincing balance of traditional beer aesthetics with craft beer quirkiness. See full project