Interior view of Warkartz studio, where proyectosLA will open in September.

COURTESY PROYECTOSLA

Luiza Teixeira de Freitas and Claudia Segura, the curators behind proyectosLA, an upcoming fair-exhibition hybrid that will coincide with the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, have announced the names of the 62 participating artists, including Marta Minujín, Julio Le Parc, Amalia Ulman, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Carmen Argote, and Rubén Ortiz-Torres.

Those artists come from 19 galleries based in Latin America and the United States, both emerging and established, from Cecilia de Torres (of New York) and Nara Roesler (New York, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro) to Arredondo/Arozarena (Mexico City) and Instituto de Visión (Bogotá). The represented artists come from throughout the regions and span multiple generations.

“The idea is also to integrate different dialogues between works that maybe would not appear together,” Teixeira de Freitas told ARTnews.

“The theme had to be very wide, very open that could integrate the different artists, modern artists, contemporary artists,” Segura added.

Claudia Segura, left, and Luiza Teixeira, the curators of proyectosLA.

GONÇALO F. SANTOS

The project, which will be staged in a converted 20,000-square-foot warehouse in downtown Los Angeles, will run from September 16 to October 28 and is now officially a part of PST: LA/LA it, a far-reaching exhibition initiative that will see over 70 exhibitions take over institutions across Southern California focusing on Latin American art history and its relationship to Los Angeles.

Several of the artists included in proyectosLA are also in PST shows, including Argote and Mondongo, who are in “Home–So Different, So Appealing” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Minujín, who is in “Radical Women” at the Hammer Museum; and Paulo Bruscky, who will be in “Xerografia: Copyart in Brazil, 1970-1990” at the University Galleries at the University of San Diego. Ortiz-Torres, who will also have a solo gallery show at Royale Projects as part of PST, is a cocurator of a PST: LA/LA exhibition, “How to Read El Pato Pascual: Disney’s Latin America and Latin America’s Disney” at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture in Los Angeles and the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State L.A.

The show’s title, “Here the border is you,” seems to feed off PST: LA/LA’s recently adopted tagline, “A Celebration Beyond Borders,” a nod to the U.S.’s current political climate, which has been marked by a rise in anti-immigrant rhetoric and Donald Trump’s calls over the past two years to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. “The definition of a border is the line separating two countries, administrative divisions, other areas, people and cultures,” Teixeira de Freitas and Segura write in their curatorial statement. “Contrary to what one could expect, Los Angeles defies this explanation and the border continually dilates in each person.”

“The idea was to think of Los Angeles as the last citadel of Latin America,” Segura said. “The concept is basically thinking that the border in Los Angeles that separates Los Angeles from Latin America does not exist. Los Angeles is part of Latin America, and we could say that Latin America is in Los Angeles still, nowadays.”

“We really want to be there and see how the city and how the public feels having such a project that focuses on Latin America,” Seguara added. “I’m really curious to see what this is going to produce or what will be the consequences.”

The full list of participating artists and their galleries follows below.

Aninat Isabel Galería, Santiago, Chile
—Josefina Guilisasti
—Lotty Rosenfeld
—Raul Zurita

Arredondo/Arozarena, México City
—Fritzia Irizar
—Francisco Ugarte

Arróniz, Mexico City
—Jose María Landet
—Moris (Israel Meza Moreno)

Barro, Buenos Aires
—Nicanor Araoz
—Matias Duville
—Los Mondongo
—Amalia Ulman

Cecilia de Torres, New York
—Marta Chilindron
—Elias Crespin
—Francisco Matto
—Jesus Matheus
—Cesar Paternosto

Henrique Faria, New York and Buenos Aires
—Jesús Bubu Negrón
—Leandro Katz
—Marta Minujín
—Dolores Zinny-Juan
—Horacio Zabala

Instituto de Visión, Bogotá, Colombia
—Carmen Argote
—Felipe Arturo
—Carolina Caycedo
—Sebastian Fierro

josegarcía ,mx, Mexico City and Mérida, Mexico
—Jorge Pardo
—Eduardo Sarabia

Leon Tovar, New York
—Carlos Cruz-Diez
—Jesus Rafael Soto
—Jorge Negret
—Jorge Riveros
—Fanny Sanin

Nara Roesler, New York, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro
—Brígida Baltar
—Paulo Bruscky
—Antonio Dias
—Julio Le Parc
—Tomie Ohtake

Nora Fisch, Buenos Aires
—Fernanda Laguna

OMR, Mexico City
—José Davila
—Rubén Ortíz-Torres

Páramo, Guadalajara, Mexico
—Adrián Bará
—Javier Barrios
—Graciela Iturbide
—Emanuel Tovar

Patricia Ready, Santiago, Chile
—Cecilia Vicuña
—Patricia Dominguez
—Joaquin Sanchez

Revolver, Lima, Peru
—Jose Carlos Martinat
—Antonio Paucar
—Ishmael Randall-Weeks
—Giancarlo Scaglia

The 9.99, Guatemala City
—Dario Escobar
—Diana de Solares

Vermelho, São Paulo
—Iván Argote
—Tania Candiani
—Carmela Gross
—Dora Longo Bahia
—Nicolas Robbio

Walden, Buenos Aires
—Lourdes Grobet
—Magali Lara

Y Gallery, New York and Lima, Peru
—Artemio
—Alberto Borea