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“Mind the Gap”

New Logo for Mental Floss

(Est. 2001) “mental_floss is the international media brand that gives smart, curious knowledge junkies their fix with upbeat, witty explorations of everything from science to pop culture to tech to history. Our team of more than 40 journalists in the U.S. and U.K. specialize in finding the most fascinating elements of everything our readers want to learn more about, and we illuminate the hidden sides of topics in the news you thought you already knew all about. On top of the 20 million monthly unique visitors to mentalfloss.com, our millions of monthly views with 1.3 million subscribers on our YouTube channel, and 1.7 million Facebook fans, we’re reaching brainy Millennial influencers with mental_floss magazine, original television programming, and original products like games, t-shirts, and teaching tools. mental_floss is a 3-time Webby Award winner and a 2-time National Magazine Awards finalist.” (Note: The November/December 2016 issue was the last print edition of the magazine, which became only-web publication.)

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New Logo for Mental Floss
Logo.
New Logo for Mental Floss
Monogram.
New Logo for Mental Floss
Facebook header.

Opinion
The old logo was not good. Perhaps recognizable for its underscore and mint coloration that made it look like an actual floss brand but it was not good. The new logo isn’t good either. It may appear to be better but it’s not. It’s a mess of approaches, proportions, and weights that has yielded an imbalanced, clunky wordmark. The “M” is super heavy and looks bolder than any of the other letters. The “T” and “S”s are too condensed and the “A” too extended in contrast to the other letters. Applying a stencil cut to only the initials and in such a thin gesture is almost useless; it’s like they couldn’t commit to the idea in full. The one, sort of good thing about this is the “MF” monogram where the stencils pay off and create a unit — for an example of doing this right, though, Thonik’s work for Holland Festival is how it’s done, son. Overall, this is a disappointment in that most web publications have matured nicely over the years, outgrowing their initial first-dot-com-bubble naive logos but not this one.