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“The Slow Orange Dot Jumps over the Lazy Fox”

New Logo for Foxtel by MAUD

(Est. 1995) “Foxtel is an Australian pay television company, operating a duopoly in cable television, a monopoly in direct broadcast satellite television, and IPTV catch-up services. It was formed in 1995 through a joint venture established between News Corporation (now News Corp; through News Limited, now News Corp Australia) (FOX) and Telstra (TEL).” (Wikipedia)

Design by
MAUD (Sydney and Melbourne, Australia)

Related links
Foxtel announcement
B&T story

Relevant quote
At a special celebration event this evening, we launched a new look and new strategy designed to pronounce that Foxtel is for everyone. Regardless of genre, budget or personal circumstance, we have something for every Australian taste.

The event featured the unveiling of a dramatically different new brand and logo symbolising a major turning point in our delivery of content across multiple touch points.

We worked closely with design agency Maud on our new logo and wordmark, which are designed to express a more open and inclusive identity.

Images (opinion after)

New Logo for Foxtel by MAUD
Logo.
New Logo for Foxtel by MAUD
Logo presentation.

Opinion
I am not very familiar with the Foxtel brand but based on the headlines of the stories about the redesign it had some kind of image issue where it wasn’t perceived as the most friendly, approachable, or inclusive. Perhaps the heavy association with FOX — in both name and typographic style — didn’t help its cause. The old logo had a decent gradient ruined by the execution of the highlights that made the wordmark look all wobbly and and as if it were missing chunks of each letter. The new logo does away with the FOXiness and heaviness of the old logo and adopts the telltale sign of a friendly, approachable logo: all lowercase. The new wordmark is a geometric sans, of course, with the bonus of a customized “t”. It’s fine but forgettable and outmatched by the giant circles next to it in the form of an abstract “f”. Perhaps in a smaller size, this could have been an interesting pairing but the dots are so large that they lose any kind of nimbleness they could have achieved. Also, in aligning the dots to a grid, that upper right dot is left floating too much on its own up there, looking detached. There are no applications to see yet so there might be something there that adds life to this logo but as it stands, it’s hard to get too excited by it. If the main goal, though, was to draw a line in the sand between the old logo/old Foxtel and a new logo/new Foxtel, then this does its job.