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“Arch Nemesis”

(Est. 1925) “Göteborgs konstmuseum (Gothenburg Museum of Art) has always been contemporary in the sense that the museum has primarily acquired the contemporary art of its time, in the past as well as now. The museum has a Nordic profile and we are proud to be able to show the world’s foremost collection of Nordic painting from around the turn of the century 1900. The collection also contains older and modern Western art including works by famous international artists like Rembrandt, Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore and Louise Nevelson.”

Design by
Brandwork (Gothenburg, Sweden)

Related links
Brandwork project page

Relevant quote
The logotype literally opens up to art experiences. Two main typefaces that take turns in the spotlight contrast the contemporary and the historical, the present and the future. The color palette is drawn from the Fürstenberg Gallery and the museum’s popular collection of Nordic Fin de Siècle art, while the well-known arches in the museum’s façade inspire the logotype, patterns and iconography.

Images (opinion after)

New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Logo.
Logo can open to include messaging.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Stationery.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Business cards.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Envelopes.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Not sure.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks


New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks


New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Folder and materials.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Brochure covers.
New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks


New Logo and Identity for Göteborgs konstmuseum by Brandworks
Other materials.

Opinion
Both old and new logos are perfectly acceptable renditions of the same idea — rendering the iconic arches of the building and pairing them with a font — with the old one looking more classic and the new one more contemporary. The visual relationship is better in the new logo, with smaller arches and a bolder font. The applications are all fairly straightforward but nicely executed with a good blend of serif and sans serif typography in a cheerful but subdued color palette. The brochure covers are particularly nice, with the arches icon at the top, the wordmark at the bottom, and art stuff in between. Overall, a golf-clap type of redesign — nothing spectacular but all neatly done.