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“Betterment with Age”

New Logo and Identity for Betterment by Red Antler

(Est. 2008) “Betterment is the largest independent online financial advisor with more than $9 billion in assets under management. The service is designed to help increase customers’ long-term returns and lower taxes for retirement planning, building wealth, and other financial goals. Betterment takes advanced investment strategies and uses technology to deliver them to more than 250,000 customers across its three business lines: direct-to-consumer, Betterment for Advisors, and Betterment for Business.”

Design by
Red Antler (Brooklyn, NY)

Related links
Betterment blog post

Relevant quote
To honor our seventh anniversary, we’re launching an updated look across our platform that better represents the purpose behind our product. We are committed to continually improving and iterating based on our customers’ needs, and this shift in our visual message is an improvement in how we communicate to our customers and to the world.

Images (opinion after)

New Logo and Identity for Betterment by Red Antler
Logo.
New Logo and Identity for Betterment by Red Antler
Monogram.
New Logo and Identity for Betterment by Red Antler
Brochures.
New Logo and Identity for Betterment by Red Antler
Ad.
New Logo and Identity for Betterment by Red Antler
Tote and tee.
New look introduction.

Opinion
Someone might point out what may be obvious and I run the risk of looking like a dummy but I seriously don’t get what the old logo was? A speedometer on a mountain? A gas gauge on a giant pimple? An asteroid hitting a volcano? In any case, it wasn’t good… I mean, it wasn’t terrible, it was just odd… at least it was cleanly executed all around. The new logo separates the wordmark from the monogram, to the degree that when you are on their website you would never know they have a monogram, which is kind of drastic. The wordmark is nice with an eye-catching “tt” ligature but without much of anything else (graphically- or personality-wise). The monogram, an abstract, bar-graph “B” is okay but it looks more like a music equalizer than something to do with finance. The few applications shown feel like they are trying to distance themselves from the logo, barely showing it and lacking a clear visual relationship. There are bars, yes, but the bars all of a sudden have gradients and the typography is all big, bold, and condensed. Overall, everything looks fine and professional but maybe a little disjointed.