Dominique de Menil, a.k.a. “Mizz D.”

COURTESDY CREATIVE COMMONS

Everything Changes

The Menil Collection in Houston will close for eight months in 2018 to refinish its divine pine floors. The work will be overseen by a longtime Menil vet who has worked there since early planning stages in 1982 and refers to the late Dominique de Menil as “Mizz D.” [The Houston Chronicle]

Consider your condition via a deep “long read” profile of Timothy Morton, a philosopher whose notions of “dark ecology” and “hyperobjects” have made him a favorite of Olafur Eliasson, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Björk, and many more. [The Guardian]

Here’s a nice look at the many amazing films of Charles and Ray Eames. [The Paris Review]

Khadija Saye, whose work is showing in the Venice Biennale, is missing after the Grenfell Tower fire in London. [The Art Newspaper]

Building

At the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, “Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017” shows how “cities reflect dreams and limitations of the people who inhabit them.” [St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

“How odd that the towering genius of architecture during the third quarter of the twentieth century . . . was a mystically inclined savant who sought to reconnect his medium with its spiritual roots.” Critic Martin Filler sizes up Louis Kahn. [The New York Review of Books]

“Here comes ‘Condozilla’: Housing protest posters from around the globe.” [Los Angeles Times]

Sounds

Artist Susan Silton is staging a presentation of Olivier Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time, written and first performed in a Nazi prison camp, in a barren industrial warehouse in Los Angeles’s Arts District. [Los Angeles Times]

In Montreal, an exhibition called “Leonard Cohen: Une Brèche en Toute Chose / A Crack in Everything” opens in November. [The New York Times]

The Carnegie Library in Pittsburgh plays home, as more libraries should, to a Theremin Zone! [Twitter]

True Colors

Fans of orange and blue are in for a real treat in the form of eye-popping photographs by Reine Paradis, who lays eyes on a “a world that exists between reality and imagination.” [The Guardian]