Rembrandt’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee (1633) was among the works a Craigslist user purported to be selling.

VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Crime

A West Virginia man has been charged for falsely posting on Craigslist that he was selling two paintings from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist. [Minneapolis Star Tribune]

Former Los Angeles art dealer Perry Rubenstein has been sentenced to six months in jail for embezzling more than $1 million from clients. [U.S. News]

High-Concept Ideas

This June, Ai Weiwei’s Trance (2014), an installation featuring portraits made of Legos that was initially shown at Alacatraz, will come to Washington, D.C.’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. [The New York Times]

Pranksters published a fake academic article that stated that penises are ideas, not organs. Call it a new kind of conceptualism. [Inside Higher Ed]

Provocations

Peter Schjeldahl reviews the Museum of Modern Art’s Robert Rauschenberg retrospective, provocatively noting, “For a great artist, he made remarkably little good art,” even though his work has been so influential. [The New Yorker]

Martin Luther may have died several centuries ago, but his legacy has continued to inspire controversial works by German artists. [Deutsche Welle]

When do pictures of sex and nudity count as art? New leaked documents show that for Facebook’s standards department, the boundaries are fairly blurry. [The Guardian]

A new book explores how the Nazis crated a style of art that they deemed Fascist. [The New Republic]

Collecting

Alan Gibbs talks about building Gibb’s Farm, one of the world’s largest contemporary art parks, in New Zealand. On its grounds are works by Anish Kapoor, Sol LeWitt, and many more. [WSJ. Magazine]

“Why the Big Basquiat Sale Is Art’s Capitalist Apocalypse.” [Forward]

Extras

Other than touching a much-memed orb, Donald Trump saw some art when he was in Saudi Arabia last week. [The Art Newspaper]

A look around Camille Henrot’s show at the Kunsthalle Wien. [Contemporary Art Daily]