A still from Rachel Rose, Lake Valley (2016).COURTESY THE ARTIST, PILLAR CORRIAS GALLERY AND GAVIN BROWN'S ENTERPRISE

Rachel Rose, Lake Valley (stilll), 2016.

COURTESY THE ARTIST, PILLAR CORRIAS GALLERY, AND GAVIN BROWN’S ENTERPRISE

Every once in a while, New York galleries stray from their traditional hours-of-operation formula—10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Tuesday to Saturday, typically—for more offbeat ventures. In 2012, for a Rey Akdogan show, Miguel Abreu Gallery was open from dusk to midnight, and during a Kerstin Brätsch show, Gavin Brown’s Enterprise’s now-defunct West Village space opened at sunrise, which could be as early as 6:53 a.m., depending on the day, and closed at sunset. When Christian Marclay’s 24-hour video The Clock (2010) screened at Paula Cooper in 2011, the gallery stayed open, well, around the clock on four occasions.

This month, Gavin Brown is making another entry in the annals of weird-gallery-hours history with its Rachel Rose show at its Harlem space. The exhibition will be open from 6 p.m. to 6.a.m., from Tuesday to Saturday, meaning that visitors can stop by after work, between late-night drinks, or during an early-morning jog. To top things off, the show will not be on view between 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., a gallery representative told ARTnews. (Also on view at that space, as well as at its Lower East Side gallery, starting next week is a Rirkrit Tiravanija exhibition, open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.)

Starting tonight, the gallery will present Rose’s 2016 video Lake Valley, which previously showed at Pilar Corrias Gallery in London and, more recently, in the Venice Biennale’s main exhibition, “Viva Arte Viva.” The eight-and-a-half-minute video draws on the style of 19th-century animations and features a rabbit that navigates a lonely world over the course of a single day. “I was thinking about self-development and adulthood,” Rose told ARTnews earlier this year. “The separation between yourself as an adult and yourself as a child is modern, and these differentiations between selfhood seemed to happen at some time during the Renaissance.”

The video will be played on loop every night, and will continue playing on loop until the early morning. No gallery staff will be there while the show is open, the gallery representative said, but there will be a security guard present.