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"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni

Artists: Monica Bonvicini, Kerstin Brätsch, Tobias Spichtig

Venue: Deborah Schamoni, Munich

Exhibition Title: Five Million Years

Date: May 19 – August 11, 2018

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"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni

"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni

"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni
"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni
Kerstin Brätsch, Title TBC From ‘All Ready Maid Betwixt and Between’ series, 2018, lead, lustre and enamel and stencil black on baked antique glass, 94.9 x 63.8 cm
Kerstin Brätsch, Towards An Alphabet [Dino Runes] version B, 2018, digital print on Photo Tex, 286 x 100 cm (dimensions customizable)
"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni
"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni
Kerstin Brätsch, Unstable Talismanic Rendring_Schrättel (with gratitude to master marbler Dirk Lange), 2017, pigment, water color, ink and solvents on paper, ca. 275.6 x 182.9 cm
"Five Million Years" at Deborah Schamoni
Tobias Spichtig, What's your title again? - And yes, I'm bad with names, too., 2016, textile, resin, adhesive, steel, 50 x 44 x 120 cm
Kerstin Brätsch, Towards An Alphabet [Dino Runes] version B, 2018, digital print on Photo Tex, 280 x 340 cm (dimensions customizable)
Monica Bonvicini
Tobias Spichtig, I don´t want to know why and I hope I never will, 2016, textile, resin, metal,
170 x 40 x 30 cm
Tobias Spichtig, heute auf der Post zwei Stunden angestanden., 2018, vinyl print, oil and laquer on canvas, 200 x 150 cm
Tobias Spichtig, Planet Erde, 2018, vinyl, print, oil and laquer on canvas, 195 x 145 cm
Tobias Spichtig, I paint what I want., 2018, vinyl, print, oil and laquer on canvas, 190 x 145 cm
Tobias Spichtig, Die Erde, 2018, vinyl print, oil and laquer on canvas, 180 x 140 cm
Installation view, Tobias Spichtig, Gott, 2018, oil and acrylic on canvas, 190 x 170 cm
Installation view, Tobias Spichtig, Heiner Müller, 2017, Monica Bonvicini, 7:30 hrs, 1999 - 2018
Monica Bonvicini, 7:30 hrs, 1999 – 2018, brickstones, grout
Tobias Spichtig, Heiner Müller, 2017, used car parts and fenders, plastic shell of MIDI keyboard, hosing and piping, metal, gas tank, 250 x 270 x 150 cm
Tobias Spichtig, What's your title again? - And yes, I'm bad with names, too., 2016, textile, resin, adhesive, steel, 50 x 44 x 120 cm
Tobias Spichtig, So eine schöne Geschichte und keiner weiss, wie sie geht., 2016, textile, resin, metal, 35 x 40 x 185
Monica Bonvicini, Untitled (Rolex),  2001, collage on paper, 85 x 120 x 5 cm (framed)
Monica Bonvicini, Corner Boy, 2015, leather belts, mirror, paint, wood, 220 x 72 x 72 cm
Monica Bonvicini, NeedleKnows, 2012, 8 embroideries on paper, 23,3 x 29,5 x 2,5 cm (each)

Images courtesy of the artists and Deborah Schamoni, Munich. Photos by Ulrich Gebert.

Press Release:

This anniversary exhibition presents the five-year-old Deborah Schamoni Gallery in a broader timeframe. The idea for the exhibition originally came from “Die Marmory Show”—the gallery’s recurring experimental exhibition developed in collaboration with a guest curator.

To do this we wanted to zoom out of the spaces at Mauerkircherstrasse and observe the array of participating artists through the figure of a constellation. Monica Bonvicini would be a fixed star from the Berlin days, Kerstin Brätsch would be a returning comet on its own path through the art universe, and Tobias Spichtig would be a moon rising just above the horizon.

Let us then begin with Spichtig: a series of panel paintings show the earth and its satellites as cubes before they were able to optimize themselves into their present forms. Or are these cubes the earth’s broken future?

Sculptures from 2016 of earth’s inhabitants as mere ghosts—as intuitions wrought in frozen pieces of clothing, anticipating the human form.

Are humans already their own dinosaurs?

In Kerstin Brätsch’s wallpaper, primordial creatures seem to be peeling themselves out of the sediment. Molten quartz and slag are torn from the primordial slime. The agony of our planet’s formation appears almost cheerful here. Faces and grimaces flash through the deposits and stratifications accumulated over earth’s geological eras like premonitions of the few minutes that humanity has spent on its planet. Five years is less than a second on earth’s temporal scale!

But now there is a black monolith by Monica Bonvicini. Does this Corner Boy made of leather belts claim an eternal intelligence like the one we see in the famous opening scene of Kubrick’s 2001? Another sculpture, 7:30 hrs, could be the reconstruction of an antique site of cult worship from the remains of archaic building foundation, if only its origin were not so profane. The sculpture is the result of a professional examination for masons.

Seven and a half hours for a wall, five years for a gallery, five million for our planet’s new consciousness.

Link: “Five Million Years” at Deborah Schamoni

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